Hamelin wins gold & St. Gelais takes bronze

Charles Hamelin wins gold and Marianne St. Gelais takes bronze at World Cup in China
Five clubs to receive $1,000 from Intact Insurance World Cup Podium Tracker

SHANGHAI, China
– In China and Japan, Canadians stepped on the short and long track World Cup podiums seven times today. Short track team couple, Marianne St. Gelais and Charles Hamelin, earned bronze and gold medals respectively at the Samsung ISU World Cup #4 at the Shanghai Oriental Sport Mansion in Shanghai, China. The men’s relay team also won bronze today. In long track action in Japan, Canadians won a gold and two silver individual medals and gold in men’s team sprint.

Charles Hamelin of Sainte-Julie, Que., won his seventh medal of the season taking gold in the 500 metres in a time of 40.821 seconds. The win was his 19th in World Cup action and 56th career medal – 19 gold, 17 silver and 20 bronze. In the final, he beat Russian Vladimir Grigorev by three one hundredths of a second (0.033). Dajing Wu of China won the bronze medal in 41.687 seconds. Francois Hamelin of Sainte-Julie, Que., was fourth in a time of 41.795 seconds.

In the women’s 500-metre final, St. Gelais and Edmonton’s Jessica Gregg competed against Meng Wang and Kexin Fan of China. St. Gelais and Gregg dropped behind to third and fourth place after a fall in the second of the five-lap race. Wang won in a time of 43.743 seconds, followed by Fan (43.975) and St. Gelais (53.900).

Canada won the bronze medal in the men’s relay final in a time of 6:41.760. Korea took gold in six minutes and 38.749 seconds and the Netherlands were second in 6:38.904. Bastille, Gilday, Charles Hamelin and François Hamelin were skating in first or second place from the 19th lap to the 38th, but a slip up in the 39th lap put them a second-and-a-half behind the leaders. They could not make up the time in the last six laps (45-lap race).

In the women’s relay final, Canada was fourth after suffering a fall. They were following closely behind China in second place when a skater fell in the 10th lap. China won the gold medal, followed by Japan and Italy. Gregg, Maltais, St. Gelais and Truchon skated for Canada.

Other top 10 finishes today saw Valérie Maltais of La Baie, Que., take seventh place in the second 1,000-metre race of this World Cup. She was second in her quarterfinal, but fourth in the semifinals to advance to the B final. With only two skaters they did not skate the B final. Guillaume Bastille of Rivière-du-Loup, Que., was also seventh in the second men’s 1,000 metres. He was second in his quarterfinal, but fourth in his semifinal to advance to the B final. Like Maltais, with only two skaters they did not skate the B final.

Michael Gilday of Yellowknife and Liam McFarlane of Medicine Hat, Alta., both earned fifth place rankings in their respective distances. Gilday was fifth in the second 1,000 metres after being penalized in the final, while McFarlane won the 500-metre B final in a time of 41.551 seconds.

Here is how Canada’s skaters fared today in their individual races:

Marie-Ève Drolet of Laterrière, Que. (2nd 1000 m): She was 12th overall in the second 1000 m. She was fourth in her quarterfinal heat and eliminated.
Jessica Gregg of Edmonton (500 m): She was fourth in the 500 m in 54.56 seconds after suffering a fall. She was second in her quarterfinal to semifinal races to advance to the final.
Jessica Hewitt of Kamloops, B.C. (2nd 1000 m): She was 15th overall in the second 1000 m. She was penalized in her quarterfinal heat and eliminated.
Valérie Maltais of La Baie, Que. (2nd 1000 m): She was seventh overall in the second 1000 m. She was second in her quarterfinal, but fourth in the semifinals to advance to the B final. With only two skaters, they did not skate the B final.
Marianne St. Gelais of Saint-Félicien, Que. (500 m): She won the bronze medal in the 500 m in 53.90 seconds after suffering a fall. She was second in her quarterfinals and then won her semifinal heat to advance to the final.
Caroline Truchon of Chicoutimi, Que. (500 m): She took 16th place in the 500 m. She was fourth in her quarterfinals and eliminated.

Guillaume Bastille of Rivière-du-Loup, Que. (2nd 1000 m): He was seventh in the second 1000 m. He was second in his quarterfinal, but fourth in his semifinal to advance to the B final. With only two skaters, they did not skate the B final.
Charle Cournoyer of Boucherville, Que. (2nd 1000m): He was eighth in the second 1000 m. He was third in his quarterfinal and did not advance.
Michael Gilday of Yellowknife (2nd 1000m): He was fifth in the second 1000 m race after being penalized in the final. He won his quarterfinal and was second in his semifinal to advance to the final.
Charles Hamelin of Sainte-Julie, Que. (500 m): He won the gold medal in the 500 m in a time of 40.821 seconds. He won his quarterfinal and semifinal races to advance to the final.
François Hamelin of Sainte-Julie, Que. (500 m): He was fourth in the 500 m in a time of 41.795. He was second in his quarterfinal and semifinal races to advance to the final.
Liam McFarlane of Medicine Hat, Alta. (500 m): He was fifth in the 500 m. He won his quarterfinal and, but was fourth in his semifinal heat to advance to the B final. He won the B final in a time of 41.551 seconds.

The World Cup Podium Tracker by Intact Insurance stands at $30,000 (8 gold, 14 silver; 8 bronze). Intact Insurance will award $1,000 in cash and prizes to a local speed skating club with each individual medal win. This season’s 26th medal came from Marianne St. Gelais (bronze in the 500 m); 27th from Charles Hamelin (gold in the 500 m); 28th from Gilmore Junio (silver in the 500 m); 29th from Christine Nesbitt (gold in the 1000 m); and, 30th from Denny Morrison (silver in the 1000 m). The following clubs will each receive $1,000 from the program: the Milton Speed Skating Club, the Club de patinage de vitesse de Portneuf, the Eastman Speed Skating Club, the Club de patinage de vitesse de Montréal-Gadbois, and the Regina Speed Skating Club,